Counter-flow lanes: curbing the effects of one-way streets in Mexico City


Bus_lanes_on_Calle_des_Balderas,_Mexico_City

Dedicated “contra-flow” bus lanes on Calle des Balderas, seen looking south from the Avenida Juarez in Mexico City.

On a grid of mostly one-way roads with mixed traffic, so-called counterflow lanes created two-way bus service, helping pedestrians avoid walking roughly 1 km (0.62 miles) to other main arteries to take a bus in the opposite direction.

But a growing recognition of the dangers of such counterflow lanes is leading modern-day Mexico City to re-think the configuration.

Full article can be found here.

Maybe, just maybe, the city might instead decide to conduct an area-wide traffic analyze to look into the possibility of changing the direction of these large, one-way streets and turn them into two-way streets with full amenities, such as those found in Complete Streets policies.

Complete Streets is the name of a design concept that sees the street face as part of the urban fabric, not just as a “car sewer”. The goal of a complete streets system is to accommodate various modes of transportation while slowing down car traffic. These streets hark back to a time when the street face was for everyone, including walkers, joggers, cyclists, transit riders and car drivers.

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