Planet earth vs. roads: The epic conflict that will define the future of the world – Salon.com

L.A. Road Network

The great age of road-building is only beginning. By 2050, we will have added 15 million miles of new road to the planet — a 60 percent increase in four decades over our current total, amassed over the past 5,000 years. Nine-tenths of that network will be built in the developing world – in the basins of the Amazon and Congo Rivers, and the jungles of South Asia and Oceania.

via Planet earth vs. roads: The epic conflict that will define the future of the world – Salon.com.

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Obamacare Cancels Insurance Plans of 1800 Children in N.J. | Truth Report

Obamacare’s new mandated requirements killed New Jersey’s low-cost children’s insurance coverage plan, FamilyCare Advantage. The plan, offered by Horizon Blue Cross Blue Shield of New Jersey, was designed for children whose parents make too much money to qualify for Medicaid and offered medical, dental, and vision coverage for just $144 a month. The program, which was the first of its kind in the nation, was implemented six years ago and considered a model for others states seeking economical ways to provide quality coverage for kids from working class families.

Yet, since FamilyCare Advantage lacked things like mental health services, Obamacare deemed the children’s 1,800 plans illegal and the program shuttered last week.

via Obamacare Cancels Insurance Plans of 1800 Children in N.J. | Truth Report.

Resolving to View City Planning as ‘Preventative Medicine’ | Planetizen

Jason Coburn issues an indictment of the “community malpractice” by policy-makers that’s led to America’s glaring health inequalities, and argues that 2013 must be the year that planning works towards improving the living conditions of the poor.

In light of urban America’s enduring inequities in “life expectancy, disease and disability by racial and ethnic groups and neighborhood location,” Corburn, an associate professor at Cal Berkeley’s School of Public Health & Department of City & Regional Planning, argues that “2013 must be the year we all view community development and city planning as ‘preventative medicine.'”

Coburn then goes on to recommend the routine use of the Health Equity Impact Assessment as a planning tool.

via Resolving to View City Planning as ‘Preventative Medicine’ | Planetizen.

Abortion Activists Attack Pro-Life Groups Office, Destroy Camera | LifeNews.com

Semantics are everything when it comes to getting people to take sides on the abortion issue. For example, a journalist recently used the phrase “term fetus bones” instead of simply “baby bones” to describe tiny bones found in a field.

Similarly, Troy Newton, head of a pro-life group in Kansas, has his own way with words. He said this, after an attack on his office in Central Kansas:

“Each innocent child is totally helpless against the abortionist’s deadly knife as he wickedly stabs her in the back of the skull, pulls her out by the feet, twists her tiny head around to break her neck, and then tosses her lifeless little body in the trash with yesterday’s garbage.”

via Abortion Activists Attack Pro-Life Groups Office, Destroy Camera | LifeNews.com.

Florida hopes to release genetically modified mosquitoes | WJLA.com

Mosquito control officials in the Florida Keys are waiting for the federal government to sign off on an experiment that would release hundreds of thousands of genetically modified mosquitoes to reduce the risk of dengue fever in the tourist town of Key West.

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If approved by the Food and Drug Administration, it would be the first such experiment in the U.S.

via Florida hopes to release genetically modified mosquitoes | WJLA.com.

Haiti: 1.8 Million People Impacted By Sandy, According to UN

Around 1.8 million Haitians have been affected by Hurricane Sandy, according to data collected by the United Nations’ Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs.

The number comes after an earlier report saying 1.2 million Haitians faced food insecurity as a result of the storm, which killed 60 people in Haiti.

Up to 2 million people are at risk of malnutrition in Haiti, according to Jens Laerke, spokesperson for the OCHA.

The OCHA, which has expressed continued concern for the nearly 350,000 Haitians still living in tent camps for displaced persons from the 2010 earthquake, said that while most tent residents that had been evacuated before the storm returned home, around 1,500 people remain in 15 hurricane shelters in Haiti.

Late last week, a spokesperson for the UN World Health Organization said there was limited access to health services and restocking supplies due to impassable rivers and damaged and obstructed roads.

The WHO also warned that poor sanitary conditions could increase the risk of cholera transmission, which has reportedly already seen a rise since Sandy.

via Haiti: 1.8 Million People Impacted By Sandy, According to UN.

Sandy Victims to Confront Cold, Another Storm | Common Dreams

Cold temperatures and a Nor’easter loom over Sandy survivors still without power and heat. Temperatures dipped down to 39 in New York City Saturday night and are expected to get even colder Sunday night. Weather Underground co-founder Dr. Jeff Masters expects the mid-Atlantic and New England to face an early-season Nor’easter on Wednesday bringing strong winds and heavy rains to areas still affected by Hurricane Sandy.

via Sandy Victims to Confront Cold, Another Storm | Common Dreams.

What’s Really Happening In Blacked-Out Manhattan | Co.Exist

The lack of an official, coordinated door-to-door response here in downtown, close to some of the most affluent neighborhoods in the country, is a bit chilling. Currently across the five boroughs almost half a million people are still without power. If you were going to target people most likely to need help when the power and water is out, it would be the elderly residents of high-rise towers like the ones that surround us. According to a 2011 NYU report, the East Village, Lower East Side, and Chinatown have a population of 169,000. Over 34% of the housing is low-income, 60% more than in the rest of Manhattan, comprising tens of thousands of people. And the lights are out for all of them.

via 1 | Whats Really Happening In Blacked-Out Manhattan | Co.Exist: World changing ideas and innovation.

Without Electricity, New Yorkers on Food Stamps Can’t Pay for Food – COLORLINES

New York parents on food stamps are not able to feed their children.

Many of the low-income residents receive cash and supplemental nutritional assistance from the state electronically through what the New York State Office of Temporary and Disability Assistance calls Electronic Benefit Cards EBT.Recipients buying eligible foods are suppose to swipe their EBT cards like any other credit card for their purchases but since Hurricane Sandy hit, most Lower East Side stores don’t have electricity to run credit card transactions and are only accepting cash. Leaving many people on EBT with empty wallets, empty refrigerators and no access to food.

via Without Electricity, New Yorkers on Food Stamps Can’t Pay for Food – COLORLINES.