Commuters Snatch Up Bicycles in Storm’s Wake – US Business News – CNBC

In New York’s transportation woes, there is finally a silver lining. New Yorkers are biking and carpooling in the wake of Hurricane Sandy’s impact on all modes of motorized transportation.

In the midst of congested transit left in Super Storm Sandy’s wake, more New Yorkers are opting to ride bicycles.

“Yesterday we outsold our busiest summer Saturday,” said Emily Samstag, manager of Bicycle Habitat in Brooklyn, speaking to a surge in bike-related sales just one day after Hurricane Sandy ravaged the East Coast. “Our first customer walked in and said: ‘The subways are down so I have to buy a bike’. That was standard all morning.”

via Commuters Snatch Up Bicycles in Storm's Wake – US Business News – CNBC.

Everything Will Be Too Big to Fail – By John Seo | Foreign Policy

How smart is Smart Growth?

Too Big to Fail?

But density has consequences. Cramming more than half the world’s population and production onto a relatively small area of mostly coastal land means that the cost of natural catastrophes of all kinds will rise dramatically. This year’s earthquake in Japan, which caused more than $300 billion in economic damage, was just a preview; a decade and a half from now, a single hurricane or earthquake will come with a potential price tag of $1 trillion or more. Imagine a world in which economic damage equivalent to that caused by a major war or the detonation of a midsized nuclear weapon in a major city could materialize with a warning of only a few days (in the case of a hurricane) or just one second (an earthquake).

via Everything Will Be Too Big to Fail – By John Seo | Foreign Policy.

Brent Toderian: Does Your Neighbourhood Pass ‘Trick-Or-Treat’ Test?

Great neighbourhoods for trick-or-treating also tend to be great neighborhoods for families everyday:

Tree-lined streets designed for walkers more than speeding cars.

Enough density and community completeness, to activate what I call “the power of nearness” – everything you need, nearby.

Good visual surveillance through doors and stoops, windows (and I don’t mean windows in garages), porches and “eyes on the street.”

Connected, legible streets that let you “read” the neighbourhood easily -grids tend to be good for this, but other patterns work too.

All of these are great for trick-or-treating, and equally great for walkable, healthy, economically resilient communities year-round.

via Brent Toderian: Does Your Neighbourhood Pass 'Trick-Or-Treat' Test?.